True: Humans aren’t the only animals affected by oxytocin. One study suggests the hormone makes dogs more friendly toward their owners. Researchers administered oxytocin to 16 adult dogs of different breeds and watched their behavior, paying specific attention to “bonding” behavior like sniffing, nudging, licking, and playing. “We found that after receiving the oxytocin spray, dogs displayed more affiliative behaviors and paid more attention to their owners than during the controls,” said the study’s lead author Teresa Romero. The substance may someday be useful in helping abused dogs trust their new, loving owners.